CURRENT

UPCOMING

PAST

Suzanne Hazlett

Universal Solvent

February 1st - March 5th, 2017

Gallery Walk February 17th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat February 18th, 10am

 

I am inspired by the nuances of texture and light found in nature and in urban environments. All the media I work with come from nature: ground marble, wax, and crystals from the sap of fir trees.  The natural ingredients are more appealing to me than synthetics – I love that they come from the earth. I love the luminous quality of encaustic paintings. Some have an obfuscation to them, like that experienced when enveloped by the mystique of fog.

 

Following the ritual of adding and subtracting what may be twenty or thirty layers of color and material, and when I have captured and expressed the essence of that which has inspired me, my paintings arrive at the eventual visual and tactile end of their journey as I arrive at the end of my personal path to convey the evocative quality of water in all its myriad iterations.

 

In Universal Solvent, I have sought to capture the translucence of watercolor and the fluidity of tides, currents and ripples. I have also been influenced by water in its frozen forms of ice and snow and by the glaciers I have climbed with my husband. Water figures prominently in the memories and imaginations of all cultures, and my paintings invite the viewers to bring their own narratives.

 

 

 

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Carolyn Olbum

Metamorphose

February 1st - March 5th, 2017

Gallery Walk February 17th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat February 18th, 10am

 

"In this series, 'Metamorphose', it is the combination of fallen tree limbs; their simplicity and elegance that have inspired me. Empty birds’ nests arranged in crevices and niches of the barren trees suggest an element of mystery and history, of life in nature.

 

 For me, through the alchemy of bronze casting, each composition tells a story."

-Carolyn Olbum

 

The act of absorbing her environment is crucial to Carolyn Olbum's process — her family and her surroundings are her inspiration. During walks she gathers dried vines, branches, seedpods, and other objects of nature that may then hang in her studio for months, lived with and studied, before the act of translation begins. She combines various materials and textures in her search for expressive forms, lines, and evocative moments, and the original material is transformed, losing its identity as a "stick" or a "vine," becoming instead an original composition, an iconic, enduring work of art.

Elisabeth Roark, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Art

Chatham University

 

 

 

 

 

Kathy Moss

March 2th - April 15th, 2017

Gallery Walk March 10th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat March 11th, 10am

 

My goal is to make beauty. The impetus to make paintings is motivated in part by my desire to the express the inexpressible: the inescapable dualities of existence.

 

I use botanicals as archetypes in my work.  I was aware of the suggestiveness of, and psychological meaning attached to some flowers. They are ambiguous, mysterious, a way to get to the paint. and in large scale represent heads, beats, landscape. I use these objects as subject matter, in silhouette. I also refer to my imagery as ‘girlie’ as the motifs and even mere suggestions of flowers and hearts are usually associated with being female, and feminine. My work addresses issues of power, solipsism, hierarchies by presenting imaginary orders, arrangements that would not occur in the natural world; I am working in response to and partly inspired by both external and internal chaos.  I have turned them- flowers, seed pods, skeletons of pine cones, thistles into icons. The motifs are beards; their arrangement a poetic depiction of the internal self.

 

The work has evolved over the last twenty years into a personal iconography, a world of glistening, minimalist surfaces, with floating objects employed as signs. The paintings play with bridging the two worlds of the conceptual and the representative, delicate, minimal amounts of paint oozing and floating on the muscular chalk and oil surface while the subject matter exists in deep space. I am making a beautiful image and simultaneously commenting on the nature of paint and the act of making. This is, in part, the text and the subtext of my work. Influenced by work as a surface designer I have come to see repetition as a type of abstract structure; one which infers less linear narrative even as a narrative is added by the inferred denial of it. I imply pattern as a way of giving meaning- suggesting a rhythm, and then breaking that rhythm. I am interested in the edge, dark on light, and its stark effect of push and pull, the situation of figure on ground. Color is subtle, implicitly referential. The paintings are formal in orientation. I think of my work as situational haiku: a rare, tightly held moment. Ultimately the works must succeed formally, hold the surface, have a discreet narrative, and be beautiful.

 

Lynda Lowe

By a Grace of Sense

December, 21 2016 - February 5, 2017

Gallery Walk December 29th, 5-8pm 
 Artist Chat December 30th, 4pm

 

After completing an MFA at Indiana University, Lynda Lowe began a fifteen-year teaching career at Wheaton College and Northern Illinois University. She left her academic position and began painting full-time, then soon after moved to Washington State. The surrounding environment and travel abroad profoundly impact her work. Additionally, Lowe’s interest in the relationships between art and science, perception and consciousness is evident in her imagery that layers text and poetry fragments, scientific observations and mathematical formula, alongside highly rendered recognizable objects.

 

Lynda Lowe’s artwork has been widely exhibited nationally in galleries and museums. She’s the recipient of numerous grants including two Illinois Arts Council Fellowships. She has had over forty solo exhibitions and is included in many corporate and public collections.

 

Throughout the exhibition, as in much of Lowe's work,  examining approaches to human perception and themes of paradoxical union - darkness and light, stillness and movement, gesture and geometry, the concrete and the ephemeral – continue to be investigated. She finds herself often playing on the edge of the frontier, examining what is knowable and familiar, and speculating about the infinite and enigmatic.

 

 

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Robert McCauley

Not About the Bear

December, 21 2016 - February 5, 2017

Gallery Walk December 29th, 5-8pm

 

While Robert McCauley’s paintings, drawings, installations and mixed media works are rooted in the tradition of 19th century American Romanticism, his narratives are contemporary, timely and relevant. Through the metaphorical juxtaposition of found objects, inscribed texts on frames and ambiguous titles, McCauley addresses a wide variety of contemporary themes and issues, including cultures in collision, environmental ethics, humankind’s impact on nature and the appropriation of nature in art.

 

McCauley’s paintings are sometimes ambiguous, but not so much that no meaning comes across. Returning to his childhood haunts each summer has shown the artist how much things keep changing. “The salmon streams I fished in are silted up and have no more salmon,” he says. “The Native Americans used to set a trap of chicken wire a half mile out to sea, and I would watch the salmon in the trap in awe. That’s gone. Even the huge fishing resorts are gone because the fish are gone. Clear-cutting is still common. A small greenbelt of ten feet on either side of the roads makes you think you’re looking at forest, but beyond that it’s just devastation.”

 

 

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Preview 2017

December, 21 2016 - February 5, 2017

Gallery Walk December 29th, 5-8pm

 

Morgan Brig • Linda Christensen • Daniel Diaz-Tai • Raphaëlle Goethals • Margaret Keelan • Gary Komarin • Gwynn Murrill • Marcia Myers • Carolyn Olbum • Luis González Palma • Robb Putnam • Rana Rochat • Jane Rosen • Kiki Smith • Julie Speidel • Jack Spencer • David Wharton • Laura Wilson

 

The annual Preview exhibition features artists who will have solo exhibitions in the upcoming year.

 

Color V

Featuring Squeak Carnwath, Linda Christensen, Bean Finneran, Raphaëlle Goethals, Gary Komarin, Marcia Myers, Rana Rochat, Julie Speidel.

October 26th - December 15th, 2016

SPECIAL EVENT Gallery Party, November 25th, 4-6pm

 

Artists in this exhibition use color as a predominate component of their artwork. Linda Christensen’s figurative paintings deal with life’s everyday occurrences. Her work features contrast of extremes in color and ambiguity of space. The liveliness of Bean Finneran's hand rolled ceramic sculptures resembles the creativity of nature.

 

The encaustic medium allows Raphaëlle Goethals to form layers upon layers of subtle color, which take on a luminous quality. Rana Rochat's new paintings use scrawling lines, rhythms of dots and texture, and sophisticated color to create an uplifting atmosphere. Gary Komarin’s abstract painting style visually engages the viewer with richness of color as a primary message.  Marcia Myers utilized natural pigments to capture the essence of her Italian experiences.  Julie Speidel’s newest work features bold colors matched with her iconic forms influenced by ancient artifacts.

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Judith Kindler

Desire

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat September 3rd, 10am

 

Is there a connection to the various things we desire? Judith Kindler presents this question in her recent works focusing on objects of desire as well as the idea of desirability in her large scale mixed media wall works.

 

What makes someone desirable is explored through implications of sexuality, beauty, strength, or vulnerability.  What drives our response to objects of desire take on much different measures of value, excellence, usability, quality, uniqueness or creativity. Playing with these ideas, Kindler brings together a body of work that is both powerful and intriguing.

 

Click here to see additional work by
Judith Kindler.

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Suzanne Hazlett

Southern Exposure

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat September 3rd, 10am

 

“My paintings have an earthen, organic quality which begins with the materials. Marble plaster, clay, beeswax, natural pigments and oil glazes are the parts of the whole. By layering color and media, the surface of my paintings acquire a refined coarseness and quiet abstraction that evoke an emotional response.

 

On a daily basis, we encounter a great volume of verbal, written and visual communication - details and demands, both substantive and irrelevant. When I arrive at my studio, I’m seeking a quietude - a mental stillness.

 

The layering protocol I undergo to create my paintings is both laborious and blissful. I welcome the solemnity of the process. I intend the resulting pieces to convey a sense of depth and to offer evidence of their evolution.

 

Following the ritual of adding and subtracting what may be twenty or thirty layers of color and material - my paintings arrive at the eventual visual and tactile end of their journey.

 

The final interaction of hue and substance adequately articulate all I intend to convey. If there is a narrative or story to be found in my work, I offer that to the viewer to ascribe.”

 

Click here for more work by Suzanne Hazlett

 

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Daniel Diaz-Tai

 

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm

 

Born in Venezuela but raised between Cumana, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Beijing and San Francisco, Daniel Diaz-Tai has always defined himself as a Latino-Asian male.

 

His multiple homes have strongly influenced his chosen career as a visual artist. While he began his career in the arts with a B.F.A. in Graphic Design from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, he also earned a M.F.A in Painting from the Academy of Art University of San Francisco. His work developed from the need to find common ground between his journeys. By creating his own language through painting and calligraphy, he discovered a process that allows him to express himself. His studio is currently based in southern California. Daniel Diaz-Tai’s artwork has been shown throughout the United States, Venezuela and Asia.

 

Daniel Diaz-Tai presents us with a series of Abstract Paintings layered with stories, emotion and texture. In these paintings, you can feel competing emotions stemming from the artist’s international journeys. His subconscious compositions embrace the ups and downs of life. They encourage us to note the temporal nature of life. If you think about it, nothing is reality as each moment is fleeting. Each line completes and complements the intensity of the other to unfold bold emotions and tell layered stories using asemic language.

 

Click here to see additional work by
Daniel Diaz-Tai.

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Michael Gregory

 

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat September 3rd, 10am

 

Michael Gregory’s work is immediately recognizable with its American icons of barns, homesteads, and imagined fields. These structures, while forefront in his previous works, now play evenly with the powerful imagery created by the light and landscape. The light, as seen over American soil, is captured from the landscapes of our enigmatic Midwestern and Western fields to the luminescent nighttime sky overlooking cityscapes.

 

Gregory says of his work: “I think the concept of the icon is important. I’m using it in the traditional sense of a picture as a vehicle for transcendence, something to meditate upon. I’m not telling a story, rather suggesting a point of departure for a topic for conversation. The artist says, “My paintings are collages of personal observation and experience, art history and interests that extend the formal language of painting. While I love paint, the act of painting is subservient to the picture which stands for the idea.”

 

Click here to see additional work by
Michael Gregory.

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Julie Speidel

Arundel

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Gallery Walk August 5th, 5-8pm

Artist Chat Sunday, July 31th, 1pm

 

Julie Speidel’s sculptures engage an extraordinary array of cultural influences, reaching back through antiquity to the stone and bronze-age peoples of Europe, the early Buddhists of China, the indigenous tribes of her native Pacific Northwest, and on into twentieth-century modernism.  Depending on our own spheres of knowledges, we may find in her work echoes of the British Isles’ megalithic stone structures, Cycladic Greek fertility figures, Native American totem poles, and dozens of other iconic cultural forms, some universally recognized, others buried by history.  At the same time, her work is strongly linked to that of modernists like Henry Moore and Picasso, who were likewise enormously influenced by the language of antiquity and sought to reinterpret it through a contemporary lens.

 

Speidel often works at the intersection between figuration and abstraction, suggesting the human form through combinations of elegantly simple shapes.  At times, her sculptures appear to diverge from the figure altogether, but they often preserve the basic components of bodies: circles and ovals evocative of heads, vertical forms echoing limbs.  On the other hand, they seem inextricably linked to the natural world, their forms equally influenced by boulders and trees.  It’s a dichotomy that, at its core, taps directly into the intimate connection ancient people felt with the earth.

 

Click here to see additional work by Julie Speidel

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Laura Wilson

That Day

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Gallery Walk August 5th, 5-8pm

Artist Chat Sunday, July 31th, 1pm

 

We are excited to announce photographer Laura Wilson joining the gallery’s list of represented artists.

 

Laura Wilson's exhibition features images from her lavish new book, That Day: Pictures in the American West, and travels to Gail Severn Gallery from Fort Worth’s Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Through stunning black & white portraits of rodeo riders, a six-man high school football team, and the Hutterites of Montana, Laura dramatically explores débutante tradition, border issues, isolation, poverty and other symbolic images of the American West.

 

"There is the myth and the romantic West, which are, of course, deep within me, growing up as I did in the 1950s," she says. “I was drawn to the landscape,” she says. “I loved the sparseness and the openness, and I found myself interested in the people there in a way I hadn’t expected.”

 

Laura’s work has appeared in many publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, The Washington Post Magazine and London’s Sunday Times Magazine. She is the author of five books—Hutterites of Montana (Yale University Press, 2000), Watt Matthews of Lambshead (Texas Historical Association, 1989), Avedon at Work (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center/University of Texas Press, 2003), Grit and Glory (Bright Sky Press, 2003) and That Day, Pictures in the American West (The Clements Center at SMU with Yale University Press, 2015).

 

Click here to see additional work by Laura Wilson.

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Marcia Myers

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Gallery Walk August 5th, 5-8pm

 

Marcia Myers utilized the formal elements of artistic expression—color, light, texture, shape, and space, to capture the essence of an experience.  Her paintings are relics of a creative process where the act of creating supersedes the product of creation.  The subject has been reduced to color. The viewer is propelled into a realm where past and present commingle.  As a conveyer of truth, her paintings explore the realm beyond the recognizable subject, a place devoid of word and imagery, where all is distilled to its very essence.  The result is pure indulgence in the sensory aspects of color, texture and space. Her paintings tantalize, inviting the viewer into ineffable dialogue with color.  It is purely through the power of color that an emotion is triggered and the viewer is transported through space and time to arrive at a present interpretation of the past.

 

Myers who passed away in 2008, is included in many prestigious private and public collections throughout the world.

 

This exhibition features the last frescos from Myers’ personal collection, including historical works on paper and the body of work that she was creating at the time of her death.

 

Click here to see additional work by Marcia Myers.

 

 

 

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Gail Severn Gallery

400 First Avenue North • P.O. Box 1679 Ketchum, ID 83340-1679 
208.726.5079  • 
info@gailseverngallery.com

 



All content copyright 2016, Gail Severn Gallery and the individual artists. All rights reserved.

Suzanne Hazlett

Universal Solvent

February 1st - March 5th, 2017

Gallery Walk February 17th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat February 18th, 10am

 

I am inspired by the nuances of texture and light found in nature and in urban environments. All the media I work with come from nature: ground marble, wax, and crystals from the sap of fir trees.  The natural ingredients are more appealing to me than synthetics – I love that they come from the earth. I love the luminous quality of encaustic paintings. Some have an obfuscation to them, like that experienced when enveloped by the mystique of fog.

 

Following the ritual of adding and subtracting what may be twenty or thirty layers of color and material, and when I have captured and expressed the essence of that which has inspired me, my paintings arrive at the eventual visual and tactile end of their journey as I arrive at the end of my personal path to convey the evocative quality of water in all its myriad iterations.

 

In Universal Solvent, I have sought to capture the translucence of watercolor and the fluidity of tides, currents and ripples. I have also been influenced by water in its frozen forms of ice and snow and by the glaciers I have climbed with my husband. Water figures prominently in the memories and imaginations of all cultures, and my paintings invite the viewers to bring their own narratives.

 

 

 

_________________

 

 

Carolyn Olbum

Metamorphose

February 1st - March 5th, 2017

Gallery Walk February 17th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat February 18th, 10am

 

"In this series, 'Metamorphose', it is the combination of fallen tree limbs; their simplicity and elegance that have inspired me. Empty birds’ nests arranged in crevices and niches of the barren trees suggest an element of mystery and history, of life in nature.

 

 For me, through the alchemy of bronze casting, each composition tells a story."

-Carolyn Olbum

 

The act of absorbing her environment is crucial to Carolyn Olbum's process — her family and her surroundings are her inspiration. During walks she gathers dried vines, branches, seedpods, and other objects of nature that may then hang in her studio for months, lived with and studied, before the act of translation begins. She combines various materials and textures in her search for expressive forms, lines, and evocative moments, and the original material is transformed, losing its identity as a "stick" or a "vine," becoming instead an original composition, an iconic, enduring work of art.

Elisabeth Roark, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Art

Chatham University

 

 

 

 

 

Gail Severn Gallery

400 First Avenue North • Ketchum, ID 83340-1679
  208.726.5079

info@gailseverngallery.com

All content copyright 2016, Gail Severn Gallery and the individual artists. All rights reserved.

Gail Severn Gallery