Gail Severn Gallery

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EXHIBITIONS 2016

Color V

Featuring Squeak Carnwath, Linda Christensen, Bean Finneran, Raphaëlle Goethals, Judith Kindler, Gary Komarin, Marcia Myers, Robb Putnam, Rana Rochat, Julie Speidel.

October 26th - December 15th, 2016

SPECIAL EVENT Gallery Party, November 25th, 4-6pm

 

Artists in this exhibition use color as a predominate component of their artwork. Linda Christensen’s figurative paintings deal with life’s everyday occurrences. Her work features contrast of extremes in color and ambiguity of space. The liveliness of Bean Finneran's hand rolled ceramic sculptures resembles the creativity of nature. Robb Putnam's sculptures created from re-purposed materials evoke playful, whimsical characters found in children’s books, but his characters are something different. The encaustic medium allows Raphaëlle Goethals to form layers upon layers of subtle color, which take on a luminous quality. Judith Kindler is an American multidisciplinary artist working in sculpture, installation, photography, and photography-based mixed media works.Rana Rochat's new paintings use scrawling lines, rhythms of dots and texture, and sophisticated color to create an uplifting atmosphere. Gary Komarin’s abstract painting style visually engages the viewer with richness of color as a primary message.  Marcia Myers utilized natural pigments to capture the essence of her Italian experiences.  Julie Speidel’s newest work features bold colors matched with her iconic forms influenced by ancient artifacts.

Click on artist's name for additional work.

 

Photography

Laura McPhee, Laura Wilson, Luis Gonzáles Palma and Jack Spencer present their photographic view of our western lands and the environments they live in.

October 26th - December 15th, 2016

SPECIAL EVENT Gallery Party, November 25th, 4-6pm

 

Laura McPhee has been photographing Idaho and the greater Western States for decades.  McPhee displays her color images shot with a large format Deardorff  box camera in galleries and museums across America.  Laura Wilson creates her black and white gelatin silver prints and Archival pigment prints depicting people and places out side of the mainstream of life in America, including cowboy culture and groups like the Hutterites from Montana and the Idaho border.  Luis Gonzáles Palma's photography focuses on the plight of the indigenous Mayas and the Mestizo people of Guatemala and native cultures in Central and South America.  Palmas work has been featured in Museums and galleries around the world including multiple exhibitions at the renown Venice Biennially.  Jack Spencer tones and paints his Black and White photos to portray an aged patina that adds a sense of mystery to his iconic images of the West and Deep South and the people and environs that give such deep sense of character of place.  All of these artists have elegant books that chronicle their creative work and are available at the gallery which you can view on our website library (Click here for library page)

Click on artist's name for additional work.

Honoring Our Landscape V

Featuring Victoria Adams, Divit Cardoza, James Cook,

Sheila Gardner, Michael Gregory, and Theodore Waddell.

October 26th - December 15th, 2016

SPECIAL EVENT Gallery Party, November 25th, 4-6pm

 

Honoring our Landscape features the aesthetic interpretation of our regional landscape by nationally renowned painters Victoria Adams, James Cook, Theodore Waddell, Sheila Gardner and Michael Gregory. These artists work in Oils and Watercolors rendering their personal vision of what makes the West a magical world.  Working in a wide range of scales and sensibilities and styles these artists all share their heart-felt passion for the West.

Click on artist's name for additional work.

 

Daniel Diaz-Tai

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Part II continued through December 16, 2016

SPECIAL EVENT Gallery Party, November 25th, 4-6pm

 

Born in Venezuela but raised between Cumana, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Beijing and San Francisco, Daniel Diaz-Tai has always defined himself as a Latino-Asian male.

 

His multiple homes have strongly influenced his chosen career as a visual artist. While he began his career in the arts with a B.F.A. in Graphic Design from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, he also earned a M.F.A in Painting from the Academy of Art University of San Francisco. His work developed from the need to find common ground between his journeys. By creating his own language through painting and calligraphy, he discovered a process that allows him to express himself. His studio is currently based in southern California. Daniel Diaz-Tai’s artwork has been shown throughout the United States, Venezuela and Asia.

 

Daniel Diaz-Tai presents us with a series of Abstract Paintings layered with stories, emotion and texture. In these paintings, you can feel competing emotions stemming from the artist’s international journeys. His subconscious compositions embrace the ups and downs of life. They encourage us to note the temporal nature of life. If you think about it, nothing is reality as each moment is fleeting. Each line completes and complements the intensity of the other to unfold bold emotions and tell layered stories using asemic language.

Michael Gregory

Light Years

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat September 3rd, 10am

 

Michael Gregory’s work is immediately recognizable with its American icons of barns, homesteads, and imagined fields. These structures, while forefront in his previous works, now play evenly with the powerful imagery created by the light and landscape. The light, as seen over American soil, is captured from the landscapes of our enigmatic Midwestern and Western fields to the luminescent nighttime sky overlooking cityscapes.

 

Gregory says of his work: “I think the concept of the icon is important. I’m using it in the traditional sense of a picture as a vehicle for transcendence, something to meditate upon. I’m not telling a story, rather suggesting a point of departure for a topic for conversation. The artist says, “My paintings are collages of personal observation and experience, art history and interests that extend the formal language of painting. While I love paint, the act of painting is subservient to the picture which stands for the idea.”

Suzanne Hazlett

Southern Exposure

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat September 3rd, 10am

 

"Following the ritual of adding and subtracting what may be twenty or thirty layers of color and material, and when I have captured and expressed the essence of that which has inspired me, my paintings arrive at the eventual visual and tactile end of their journey as well as my personal journey to convey the complex combination of grit and grace that is embodied in the modern Southern Belle.

 

I have lived most of my life as a Northwesterner, enraptured by the majestic power of the mountainous landscape. For years, my husband and I spent every weekend rock climbing and mountain climbing in the vast wilderness where I became intrigued with the layering and aggregation of the rock formations. My early work reflects the influences of this rugged landscape informed by the masculine hues of the earth.

 

After spending time with my Georgian daughter-in-law and two decidedly feminine young granddaughters, I have entered a new landscape of delicacy and elegance; I have gained some degree of southern exposure. In so doing, I have come to recognize and admire the self-esteem, discipline and respect at the root of the unapologetically pretty and feminine exterior of the Southern Belle. Through this body of work titled, Southern Exposure, my paintings rejoice in the power of pink, representing in each artwork a distinct female rite of passage. These paintings, like the formidable women and girls who inspired them, display a combination of grit and grace and celebrate the feminine spirit."

Judith Kindler

Desire

September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat September 3rd, 10am

 

Is there a connection to the various things we desire? Judith Kindler presents this question in her recent works focusing on objects of desire as well as the idea of desirability in her large scale mixed media wall works.

 

What makes someone desirable is explored through implications of sexuality, beauty, strength, or vulnerability.  What drives our response to objects of desire take on much different measures of value, excellence, usability, quality, uniqueness or creativity. Playing with these ideas, Kindler brings together a body of work that is both powerful and intriguing.

Julie Speidel

Arundel

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Part II September 1st, 2016 - October 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk September 2nd, 5-8pm

 

Speidel’s inspiration draws, in part, from her connection as a child with the ancient megaliths she encountered living in Europe. While attending boarding school in Sussex England, she went to early morning services at the Arundel Cathedral. The images of the saints from the stained glass windows have stayed with her in a special way. As she began working on Japanese Kozo paper, which she brought back from Japan in the 80’s, she incorporated sacred imagery that harkened to the windows from her past and drew from her travels throughout Asia and Europe.

 

From her studio on a picturesque island off Seattle, Speidel works in bronze, oil on paper, stone, glass and wood to create art that graces collections throughout the world. Speidel's art engages an extraordinary array of cultural influences, reaching back through antiquity to the stone and bronze-age peoples of Europe, the early Buddhists of China, the indigenous tribes of her native Pacific Northwest and on into 21st century modernism.

Laura Wilson

That Day

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Gallery Walk August 5th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat Sunday, July 31th, 1pm

 

Gail Severn Gallery is excited to announce photographer Laura Wilson joining the gallery’s list of represented artists.

 

Laura Wilson's exhibition features images from her lavish new book, That Day: Pictures in the American West, and travels to Gail Severn Gallery from Fort Worth’s Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Through stunning black & white portraits of rodeo riders, a six-man high school football team, and the Hutterites of Montana, Laura dramatically explores débutante tradition, border issues, isolation, poverty and other symbolic images of the American West.

 

"There is the myth and the romantic West, which are, of course, deep within me, growing up as I did in the 1950s," she says. “I was drawn to the landscape,” she says. “I loved the sparseness and the openness, and I found myself interested in the people there in a way I hadn’t expected.”

 

Laura’s work has appeared in many publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, The Washington Post Magazine and London’s Sunday Times Magazine. She is the author of five books—Hutterites of Montana (Yale University Press, 2000), Watt Matthews of Lambshead (Texas Historical Association, 1989), Avedon at Work (Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center/University of Texas Press, 2003), Grit and Glory (Bright Sky Press, 2003) and That Day, Pictures in the American West (The Clements Center at SMU with Yale University Press, 2015).

Marcia Myers

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Gallery Walk August 5th, 5-8pm

 

Marcia Myers utilized the formal elements of artistic expression—color, light, texture, shape, and space, to capture the essence of an experience.  Her paintings are relics of a creative process where the act of creating supersedes the product of creation.  The subject has been reduced to color. The viewer is propelled into a realm where past and present commingle.  As a conveyer of truth, her paintings explore the realm beyond the recognizable subject, a place devoid of word and imagery, where all is distilled to its very essence.  The result is pure indulgence in the sensory aspects of color, texture and space. Her paintings tantalize, inviting the viewer into ineffable dialogue with color.  It is purely through the power of color that an emotion is triggered and the viewer is transported through space and time to arrive at a present interpretation of the past.

 

Myers who passed away in 2008, is included in many prestigious private and public collections throughout the world.

 

This exhibition features the last frescos from Myers’ personal collection, including historical works on paper and the body of work that she was creating at the time of her death.

Victoria Adams

July 28th - August 31st, 2016

Gallery Walk August 5th, 5-8pm

 

Victoria Adams work includes both large-scale landscapes and small intimate jewel-like paintings of oil on linen.  Her interest features a signature sky, weather, and watery reflections.  Adams’ focal point is the inherent radiance of light found in nature. She often highlights the transforming effects of light filtered through clouds falling on the land and water below.  In her masterful hands, light reflected from sky to water and back again forms a subtle interchange between evaporating wetness and the atmospheric qualities of air itself.  Adams creates images that connect us with our own past experiences of place and more often than not evoke personal moments of stillness and meaning. Adams’ landscapes are found in Museums and private collections through out the country.

Hung Liu

Drifters

June 27th - July 27th, 2016

Gallery Walk July 8th, 5-8pm  • Artist Chat July 9th, 10am

 

Hung Liu's paintings and prints often make use of anonymous Chinese historical photographs, particularly those of women, children, refugees, and soldiers as subject matter. Liu’s paintings - often large, drippy, and washed with layers of linseed oil - can be seen as critiques of the rigid academicism of the Chinese Socialist Realist style in which she was trained, as well as metaphors for the loss of historical memory. One of the first Chinese artists to study in the U.S., Liu’s works represent the ongoing tension between emigration and immigration.

 

The recent paintings of dandelions are rendered from close-up photographs taken by the artist at various parks and monuments across the United States. The dandelions, fragile in nature, and blown and tattered by the lightest breeze, mimic how images, and personal histories, too, can be scattered by time and the winds of consciousness.

 

Liu has received numerous awards, including two painting fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and her work is represented in the permanent collections of major museums and private collections throughout the United States and Asia.

Jane Rosen

H is for ...

June 27th - August 1st, 2016

Gallery Walk July 8th, 5-8pm

 

Jane Rosen’s talent is in finding the shadows of things, the soft sepia tones of birds and mammals, the quiet and penetrating turn of a beak or gaze of a feral eye.  Rosen’s sculptures are evocative, less precise renditions of similar subject matter - and she pays as much attention to the material as to the shapes she forms with it.

 

“What I found is that animal nature is a key for us to understand our own nature. The relationship of their nature to the forces of nature all comes down to a kind of sacred map. The kind of laws that govern nature begin to become visible in the interactions between these various species. You can see that in the shape of an oyster-catcher’s bill. It opens laterally, so that it can eat clams and oysters. Not only that, but a law appears in its relationship to others...there’s a pecking order.”

 

Click here to see additional work by Jane Rosen

 

Robb Putnam

June 27th - August 1st, 2016

Gallery Walk July 8th, 5-8pm  •   Artist Chat July 9th, 10am

 

Gail Severn Gallery is excited to announce Robb Putnam’s first solo exhibition in Idaho.

 

Putnam builds animal forms with cast off blankets, shirts, fake fur, rags, thread, plastic garbage bags, leather scraps and glue. These sculptures evoke playful, whimsical characters found in children’s books, but his characters are something different: they are physically and psychologically vulnerable and seem like overgrown stuffed toys or imaginary friends—misfits whose demeanors both invite and possibly repel.  Like mutant craft projects gone awry, their surfaces suggest that the skins of these beings have been torn away, exposing their soft insides.

 

Putnam’s drawings, too, create images that carry associations with simplicity, innocence and play, but as if experienced in a fevered dream. In these works, cartoon heads drift, collide and overlap in space. These orphaned characters in search of a body attempt to reassemble them selves into a larger whole—but never quite manage the feat.

 

In both his sculptures and drawings, Putnam explores the murky spaces intersecting empathy, fear, intimacy, humor, the desire to touch or connect and the impulse to back away. Through these works, he hopes to expose a complex and contradictory human presence that mirrors our own vulnerability.

Lisa Kokin

Loss for Words

June 27th - July 26th, 2016

Gallery Walk July 8th, 5-8pm

 

Loss for Words Statement

The Loss for Words series is the logical outgrowth of my previous series, Facsimile, in which zipper fragments served as stand-ins for text. I have expanded my “writing” to now include a variety of objects and materials on substrates as varied as linen, canvas and, most recently, industrial felt.

 

In this series I invent “words” and “languages” with materials that I naturally gravitate to: small domestic metal items, sewing notions, rusty metal fragments found on the street, safety pins, broken needles from the Facsimile project, and thread which I use in unruly bunches to accentuate its gestural quality. In making this work I realize how much I like using objects in ways they weren’t intended to be used, purely for the love of shape, form, juxtaposition and resonance.

 

Much of my previous work is rooted in specific content. This series has decided to be open to interpretation. Although I want to make work that comments on the world around me, I seem to be at a loss for words.

 

State of Nature V

Painting, Photography & Sculpture

May 29th - June 24th, 2016 • Gallery I

 

Gail Severn Galley's "State of Nature V" group exhibition explores our open air environment through the eyes of our represented artists. The exhibition features many different disciplines of painting, sculpture and photography.

 

Artists included in this exhibition are Betsy Eby, Bean Finneran, Margaret Keelan, Judith Kindler, Hung Liu, Laura McPhee, Kenna Moser, Rene Rickabaugh, Mary Snowden, Jack Spencer and Alison Stewart.

 

 

 

James Cook Sheila Gardner Laura McPhee

March 7th - April 29th, 2016

Gallery Walk March 11th, 5-8pm

 

Features aesthetic interpretation of the land by internationally renowned painters James Cook, Sheila Gardner and photographer Laura McPhee.

 

Click here for additional work by James Cook Sheila GardnerLaura McPhee

The Experience of Color

Bean Finneran • Gary Komarin

Cole Morgan • Marcia Myers • Julie Speidel

February 5th - April 29th, 2016

Gallery Walk March 11th, 5-8pm

 

Gary Komarin, a master of  Post-Painterly Abstraction, has been at the forefront of contemporary art with a bold and colorful style recognized by art collectors worldwide, and museum curators alike. While looking at Komarin’s paintings and his works on paper, the viewer is invited to the intimate space where a dialogue is established between painter and painting. Cole Morgan’s detailed paintings unites his spontaneous visual-language, bright color, handwritten scrawl, under painting and characters with formalist, abstract compositions. Julie Speidel’s colorful stainless steel sculptures encompass an array of cultural influences, including forms from the stone age into twentieth-century modernism.  Using a simple curve as the core foundation of her work, Bean Finneran’s  color saturated ceramic sculptures resemble organic forms found in nature.

 

 

Linda Christensen • Betsy Eby

March 7th - April 29th, 2016

Gallery Walk March 11th, 5-8pm

 

As a child, Linda Christensen was always in tune with the subtle shifts in mood of those around her. This sensitive observation of friends and strangers has continued to inspire her work as an artist. Christensen catches people who are in a “private place” and are turned within. This is usually a brief moment, but something that we all do without being aware. Christensen finds something magical in seeing the humanness in others as they turn inwards, reflectively but uncritically.

 

Click here for additional work by Linda

 

Using  oils, knives, blowtorches, and waxes she formulates herself, Betsy Eby creates encaustic paintings as rhythmic compositions.  The artist says her best work results on the days she also dictates time to playing classical piano.   Eby finds inspiration in privacy and being surrounded by nature.  “I came to painting because I wanted to make visible the place music lives,” she says, “and to make tangible the fleeting qualities of life and all that is fragile.”

 

Click here for additional work by Betsy.

 

Linda Christensen

Pantomime

February 5th - March 4th, 2016

Gallery Walk February 12th, 6-8pm  • Artist Chat February 13th, 10am

 

As a child, Linda Christensen was always in tune with the subtle shifts in mood of those around her. This sensitive observation of friends and strangers has continued to inspire her work as an artist. Christensen catches people who are in a “private place” and are turned within. This is usually a brief moment, but something that we all do without being aware. Christensen finds something magical in seeing the humanness in others as they turn inwards, reflectively but uncritically.

 

Linda Christensen’s painting captures inspiration from the Bay Area Figurative Movement, but her work also has the extreme contrast of color and ambiguity of space seen in Mark Rothko’s work. The solitary figures in her paintings are also reminiscence of Edward Hoppers figure. Although Christensen finds inspiration from many different artists, her paintings are purely her own voice.

 

Click here for additional work by Linda

James Cook

Inside Out

February 5th - March 4th, 2016

Gallery Walk February 12th, 6-8pm

 

James Cook exposes himself to diverse environments that inform his aesthetic views. Inspired by nature and the world around him, his canvases are powerful evocations of nature’s majesty. Cook’s work has been described as monumental, but the essence of his paintings (whether it is a cityscape or landscape) is contained in the singular brush stroke, line, and mark he orchestrates. Each stroke, each line, each mark is a distinctive note contributing to a chorus that echoes and resounds in a grand symphony. The viewer may be inspired by the grandeur of colorful and untamed worlds created by Cook, but it is the radiance of the painted surface that invites one to plunge into the depths. There is a lush quality to the surface of the canvas that is visceral, and even as you are engaged in the ripples of still pools, the patterns of fall foliage, or the complex patterns of a city skyline, it is the thick impastos and scraped textures that engage the senses in the expressive temperament of the medium. It is obvious that James Cook is in love with paint. To experience his paintings is to comprehend the spirit of color, depth and movement. His love of beauty finds its way onto the canvas as he strives to create visual excitement. Cook compares himself to abstract expressionists in the way that he works, noting that there is a great deal of invention in the paint itself.

 

Connie Gibbons, Director Mulvane Art Museum

 

Click here for additional work by James

The Experience of Color

Bean Finneran • Gary Komarin • Cole Morgan • Julie Speidel

February 5th - March 4th, 2016

Gallery Walk February 12th, 6-8pm

 

Gary Komarin, a master of  Post-Painterly Abstraction, has been at the forefront of contemporary art with a bold and colorful style recognized by art collectors worldwide, and museum curators alike. While looking at Komarin’s paintings and his works on paper, the viewer is invited to the intimate space where a dialogue is established between painter and painting. Cole Morgan’s detailed paintings unites his spontaneous visual-language, bright color, handwritten scrawl, under painting and characters with formalist, abstract compositions. Julie Speidel’s colorful stainless steel sculptures encompass an array of cultural influences, including forms from the stone age into twentieth-century modernism.  Using a simple curve as the core foundation of her work, Bean Finneran’s  color saturated ceramic sculptures resemble organic forms found in nature.

 

 

Theodore Waddell

Out to Pasture

December 18th, 2015 - February 5th, 2016

Gallery Walk • Tuesday, December 29th, 5-8pm

 

Excerpt from Jennifer Complo,

McNutt Curator of Contemporary Art, Eiteljorg Museum

 

Waddell's paintings are a combination of rough marks; thick paint; transparent elegant strokes; and, on a few occasions a slow, hard line scratched into the canvas. You can feel the movement of the paint throughout the paintings but the subjects are frozen. They are not frozen as a stagnant object but captured as a solitary image. Captured, interpreted and enveloped in the landscape. They are carved out of, or laid onto the green and grey-yellow of the spring and summer, or the white canopy of winter. And sometimes there are ghosts in the paintings, the faint image of what has changed in the piece or decays in the pasture. These ghosts refer to Waddell's interest in life and death and our own mortality. They are metaphors for the struggle and change that is constant in life. In his artist's statement he says, "The understanding of death brings about a feeling of wonderfulness and appreciation of life and just how fragile and magical it all is."

 

Click here for additional work

Gary Komarin

The First Green Rushing

December 18th, 2015 - February 5th, 2016

Gallery Walk • Tuesday, December 29th, 5-8pm

 

A master of Post-Painterly Abstraction, Gary Komarin has been at the forefront of contemporary art with a bold and colorful style recognized by art collectors worldwide, and applauded by museum curators and art critics alike. While looking at Komarin’s paintings and his works on paper, the viewer is invited to the intimate space where a dialogue is established between painter and painting.

 

“My paintings proceed without preconception. I paint to find out what it is that I am going to paint. I think of myself as a stagehand who sets up the conditions necessary for drama to unfold. Once a painting has achieved a life of its own, when it speaks back to you as a painter, this is a good place to be. For me, the best paintings are those that paint themselves.”

 

Gary Komarin

New York, 2015

 

Click here for additional work

Vignettes

December 18th, 2015 - February 5th, 2016

Gallery Walk • Tuesday, December 29th, 5-8pm

 

Michael Gregory, Jonathon Hexner, Laura McPhee & Jack Spencer

 

“Vignettes” features four of the gallery’s well-know artists including photographers Laura McPhee and Jack Spencer.  Both internationally recognized for their stunning landscapes and images of indigenous people.  Michael Gregory’s paintings of rustic barns and rural landscapes are included in blue-chip collections and museums across the country.  Jonathon Hexner’s contemporary ‘gunpowder’ paintings are formed with a variety of destructive processes.

Animalia IV

October 30th, 2015 - February 5th, 2016

Gallery Walk December 29th, 5-8pm

 

Jonathon Hexner, Margaret Keelan, Hung Liu, Robert McCauley, Ed Musante, Deborah Oropallo, Alexander Rohrig, Jane Rosen, Brad Rude, Mary Snowden, Inez Storer & Theodore Waddell.

 

The artist's in this annual exhibition visually address man's relationship to nature as a primary concern, while art history, environmental ethics, beauty and aesthetics still resonate in the work.

 

Sculptors Margaret Keelan, Brad Rude & Alexander Rohrig transform the materials stone, bronze, ceramic and found objects into animals both domestic and wild. Ed Musante’s small-scale paintings of birds and animals, painted on his signature ‘found cigar boxes’, are intimate portraits of wildlife, as are Mary Snowden's meticulously stitched & embroidered farmyard and wild animals. Robert McCauley’s oil paintings create narratives about history, deforestation and ecological issues.

  Theodore Waddell’s love of his Bernese mountain dogs can be seen in both his paintings and sculptures. Hung Liu’s oil paintings of pigeons capture the urban fowl in majestic form. The juxtaposition of Jonathon Hexner’s work is evident in the silence of his animals and the explosive process of their creation. Deborah Oropallo's newest body of work focuses on the farm to table concept and the relationship between animals and food.

400 First Avenue North • P.O. Box 1679 Ketchum, ID 83340-1679 
208.726.5079  • 
info@gailseverngallery.com

 



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Gail Severn Gallery