Gail Severn Gallery

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EXHIBITIONS 2009

Animal - Form and Spirit

 

December 23rd - February 1st

 

"Animal - Form and Spirit," explores animals and nature. Each artist depicts animals in different ways but they all deliver the same message, the sense of togetherness and the importance of their presence. Featuring Jane Rosen, Ed Musante, Brad Rude, Robert McCauley, Gwynn Murrill, Nicole Charbonnet and Jonathon Hexner.

The Artist Eye

 

December 23rd - February 1st - Continued

 

The "Artist Eye" is a contemporary show featuring work by artists working in all mediums. They explore surface, texture and depth while displaying their various mixed media techniques. Some have simple lines while others make bold statements. This show features Nicolas Africano, Lynda Lowe, Raphaelle Goethals, Squeak Carnwath, Hung Liu, Cole Morgan, Gary Komarin, Jun Kaneko, Judith Kinder, Christopher Reilly, Woods Davy, Julie Speidel, Bean Finneran, Andrew Harper and Mario Reis.

Cole Morgan

 

December 23rd - February 1st

 

American-born, Belgian artist, Cole Morgan creates detailed mixed media paintings. His work is a process of layering and combining mediums. He combines his own spontaneous visual-language of bright colors, mysterious handwritten scrawl, scratches, glimpses of underpainting, and strange characters with formalist, abstract compositions. His paintings are full of objects that appear 3-dimensional. The vibrant colors jump off the canvas and create a puzzle like grid full of mystery. The mixed media surfaces entice the viewer to explore and unravel the canvas.

 

David deVillier

 

December 23rd - February 1st

 

David deVillier’s colorful narrative paintings, framed in bold steel frames welded by the artist, are filled with whimsical images of women, birds and musical influences. In his paintings you will find unassuming combinations of characters and props that present the opening act to a story. deVillier’s paintings are full of wit providing humor with an underlying emotionally message. The drama of each piece will unfold as you delve into the depth of the painting.

 

Betsy Eby

The Red Paintings

 

February 1st - February 26th

 

This will be the first solo exhibition at the Gail Severn Gallery for nationally recognized painter Betsy Eby.

 

Betsy’s fluid encaustic pieces draw the viewer in for a closer look with their delicate movement and light.

 

Eby states -

“I began working with wax long ago because it seemed to be the only material manipulatable toward achieving atmospheric and ephemeral depth.  I developed my own material process to record the Northwest's oyster light. Through viscous, transparent layers of fused wax and varnish, velaturas and layered depths attempt to represent the silver sfumato so endemic to the Pacific sky and sea. Calligraphic gestures suggest winged flight patterns, stark, winter brambles, tidal currents, or inky, moist blossoms, as well as musical rhythms impressed upon me by my lifelong practice of classical piano playing.

 

I try and walk the line between abstraction and representation in my work, in the same way the Chinese painters recorded expressions. Through recording mimetically, I hope to activate an interactive experience with a sense beyond the senses, or as Kuo Si said "...the deep peace that [the artists'] paintbrush will convey by using the visible to suggest the invisible."”

Tony Foster

Secret Sites - Watercoulor Diaries by Tony Foster

 

August 31st - October 2nd

 

Tony Foster has a lifestyle that many would admire. He travels to the world’s remotest wildernesses, sets up easels and works on site. In order to achieve his Watercolor Diaries, he hikes into untouched wilderness, camps and explores the area. His canvases range in size, some up to 6ft long. Like a true explorer, Tony collects treasures from each journey and places them in souvenir boxes which then become an integral part of each piece. The paintings are stunning evidence of what he encounters on his journey - not just the landscape, but flora and fauna, notes, souvenirs and anecdotes.

The Artist Eye

 

November 20th - December 21st

 

The "Artist Eye" is a contemporary show featuring work by artists working in all mediums. They explore surface, texture and depth while displaying their various mixed media techniques. Some have simple lines while others make bold statements. This show features Kris Cox, Raphaelle Goethals, Squeak Carnwath, Hung Liu, Cole Morgan, Gary Komarin, Jun Kaneko, Valerie Hammond, Judith Kinder, Deborah Oropallo, Christopher Reilly, Woods Davy, Julie Speidel, Bean Finneran, Andrew Harper and Mario Reis.

Animal - Form and Spirit

 

November 20th - December 21st

 

"Animal - Form and Spirit," explores animals and nature. Each artist depicts animals in different ways but they all deliver the same message, the sense of togetherness and the importance of their presence. From Ed Musante’s painted cigar boxes, to Brad Rude’s whimsical bronze sculptures and Robert McCauley’s dramatic oil paintings.

Ed Musante and Jane Rosen

 

October 5th - November 16th

 

Both Ed Musante and Jane Rosen have a passion for nature.

Ed Musante's small-scale paintings of birds and animals, painted on wood panel or his signature found cigar boxes, are intimate portraits of wildlife. Musante captures the presence of each bird through careful observation and attention to detail. His exquisite paintings incorporate text and pattern from the cigar boxes.

 

Jane Rosen spills coffee's and teas, reading the “tea leaves,” in much the same way as locating strange beings in cloud formations, the drawings, sculpture and prints allow for a re-cognition of what is seen in nature. Using recycled stone, promoting the knowledge of our environment, observing the places where nature is larger than culture, are the treasure hunt that Rosen speaks of.

Sheila Gardner and Tony Foster

Inspired by Idaho

Work by Watercolorist Tony Foster and Sheila Gardner

 

October 5th - November 16th

 

Tony Foster has a lifestyle that many would admire. He travels to the world’s remotest wildernesses, sets up easels and works on site. In order to achieve his Watercolor Diaries, he hikes into untouched wilderness, camps and explores the area. His canvases range in size, some up to 6ft long. Like a true explorer, Tony collects treasures from each journey and places them in souvenir boxes which then become an integral part of each piece.

 

Once a longtime resident of the Sun Valley area, Sheila Gardner continues to paint well-observed landscapes, rich with color and textured light. Despite a long, highly acclaimed career of observing nature, Gardner has not settled and continues to progress and develop as an artist. The artist is fascinated with how light and color forms the world around us; furthermore, Gardner is showing us how the appearance of the world transforms with constantly changing light.

Christopher Reilly and Michelle Haglund

Abundance

 

October 5th - November 16th

 

Chris Reilly and Michelle Haglund’s newest series portray the cycle of life. Their work depicts natural transformation and evolution. The work often includes seeds, foliage and blossoms referencing the cycles of life depicting growth, life and death. The work is intriguing, yet quiet and peaceful. The pieces exude a sense of mystery creating a thought and image to meditate on or with.

 

Creating this work by adding and removing layers of encaustic, the surfaces begin on panel and then pastels, watercolor and molten wax to build their incredible paintings. The tactile surfaces are sensual and seductive.

James Cook

Silver Creek

 

October 5th - November 16th

 

James Cook paints because he loves it. The smell, texture, and feel of the brush wet from the paint stimulate his hand. His work is impressionistic, however, he provides the viewer with a recognizable reality. His impasto technique creates a surface full of movement and texture. The paintings jump of the canvas, the colors bringing them to life. The details of the image can examined closely and the scene grows increasingly cohesive from afar.

 

This body of work focuses on “Silver Creek and our surrounding mountains.” He spends time in our area painting the landscape and documenting the incredible weather shifts.

A Sense of Place XIV

 

November 20th - December 21st

 

This group landscape show explores oils, watercolors and photography. These artists all define a space and bring the viewer to their destination. Featuring James Cook, Tony Foster, Laura McPhee, Theodore Waddell, Michael Gregory and Sheila Gardner. We will also be showing sculpture by David Secrest, Gwynn Murrill, Will Robinson and Mark Stasz. All these artists use natural materials creating very organic work suitable for indoors or outside.

 

Deborah Oropallo

Wild Wild West. Show

 

August 1st - August 28th

 

Deborah Oropallo’s new body of work Wild Wild West provides a playful fashion-based performance art, based on the iconic West. Her pieces portray cowgirls wearing chaps, small skirts or swinging ropes. They appear sexy, playful and powerful.

 

Deborah Oropallo says, “Any kind of adornment can be beautiful, it can be subversive. So it’s about liberation in one sense, about these women being sexually overt, and it’s about hierarchy and bondage, sex and power. I wanted the merged images... to elevate maids, widows, nurses, and brides above the rank and file and make them the new royalty.”

 

"I think I’m looking for a hybrid of images that might reflect a notion of the pop west. Although there is a female sartorial humor in this work, I’m not just making fun of it. Is it the female equivalent of the Marlboro Man, symbol or stereotype – I’m not sure."

Jane Rosen

Summer Bird

 

August 1st - August 28th

 

Jane Rosen's work negotiates the boundaries between perception and cognition. The gestures, presence, and essence of the forms that compose “summer bird,” have the taste of an instinctive hint that needs to be followed. “It is a treasure hunt using the language of my time to consider the questions of another kind of time.” Coming from a minimalist background, the works are informed by both the force of nature and the reduction to an essential movement.

 

Spilling coffee's and teas, reading the “tea leaves,” in much the same way as locating strange beings in cloud formations, the drawings, sculpture and prints allow for a re-cognition of what is seen in nature.. Glimpses that reveal a hawk posted deep within the branches of a tree, watermarks forming the silhouette of a grazing horse serve to allow the viewer to negotiate these boundaries as well. Using recycled stone, promoting the knowledge of our environment, observing the places where nature is larger than culture, are the treasure hunt that Rosen speaks of.

 

“My wish is that the drawings and sculpture reflect what is possible through accessing our own better nature. Those moments that our instinctive selves find in the face of nature are a kind of reminder of those possibilities.”

 

Brad Rude

 

August 1st - August 28th

 

Brad Rude’s richly colored bronze sculptures explore relationships between many things. He presents a variety of animals and natural elements engaged in spiritual and physical interactions, while creating a playful dialogue. Brad Rude’s sculptures add a sense of whimsy and balance to portray and encourage the understanding of animal and humane relationships. His bronze sculptures, which contain random objects and carefully chosen animals, create a story that is unique for each viewer. Rude’s sculptures range from Monumental scale outdoor compositions to intimate small scale works that touch his audience in many ways. Brad Rude’s sculpture can be seen throughout the western States and in many public installations at hospitals, libraries, schools, parks, and many private collections.

Julie Speidel

 

June 29th - July 31st

 

Encompassing an array of cultural influences, reaching back through antiquity to the stone- and bronze-age peoples of Europe, the early Buddhists of China, the indigenous tribes of her native Pacific Northwest, and on into twentieth-century modernism. Depending on our own spheres of knowledge, we may find in her work echoes of the British Isles’ megalithic stone structures, Cycladic Greek fertility figures, Native American totem poles, and dozens of other iconic cultural forms, some universally recognized, others buried by history. At the same time, her work is strongly linked to that of modernists like Henry Moore and Picasso, who were likewise enormously influenced by the language of antiquity and sought to reinterpret it through a contemporary lens.

 

“The inspiration for my work is rooted in the power of travel,” Speidel remarks, and indeed, her sculptures assimilate cultural influences in a manner reminiscent of traveloque--organic and intuitive, not academic or preordained.

Hung Liu

Prints & Paintings

 

June 29th - July 31st

 

Hung Liu paints from historical photographs of Chinese subjects including images of Chinese female “types,” prostitutes, child street acrobats, war refugees, and women laboring at such tasks as pulling a boat upriver. She is turning a documented photograph into a reflective subject both preserving and destroying the image. The photo-based image is dissolved by washes suggesting the cultural and personal narratives that exist within each image.

 

She introduces traditional Chinese imagery to the surface of her pieces by suspending bits of art history in her work such as birds, flowers, stamps, and landscapes. She wants to evoke a sense of culture and history, combining the past and present.

 

Two layers of historical representation – from traditional painting and modern photography – co-exist in her paintings.

Laura McPhee

Guardians of Solitude

 

For over five years—from 2003 to 2008—photographer Laura McPhee captured an unknown version of the modern American West. Normally based in Boston, McPhee sojourned to Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains, to be the Alturas Foundation’s first artist-in-residence. During the course of the project, she lived in Idaho roughly six months out of the year, documenting the interaction between humanity and nature. The work she produced, “River of No Return,” became her first major solo museum exhibition. The show opened at The Boston Museum of Fine Arts in May 2006, then The Boise Museum of Art and several pieces have since traveled to The Guggenheim, Shanghai.

 

In the summer of 2008, McPhee returned to Idaho to photograph the aftermath of several Sawtooth National Forest wildfires, which she includes in her latest book “Guardians of Solitude,” a sequel to “River of No Return.” McPhee photographed new images of the area such as In Fourth of July Creek Canyon, 2008. The photograph depicts the rebirth of a land scorched and otherwise left for dead by wildfire. The forest floor’s new growth of green and flowering fireweed surround the trunks of the spiky burned trees presenting a cycle of life all at once. “What interests me about the forest fire and its aftermath really takes place on a more metaphorical level,” McPhee says. “I am interested by the idea that things happen in life, which have unintended consequences and that those consequences can seem very dark. Over time the meaning of the consequences changes. The forest becomes a different kind of magical place with its own positive biological outcomes. So from an environmental perspective and from an imaginative one, the fire is not at all what it first seems.” “Guardians of Solitude” will be will be published by Iris Editions in London and will be a large format volume with only twenty images.

Judith Kindler

Gathering Together

 

March 2nd - April 17th

 

Judith Kindler peers into the individual and collective psyche in this new body of work entitled “Gathering Together”.   In mixed media paintings, sculpture and installation she explores human nature in the act of gathering together, through a series of mostly narrative imagery that combines faceless figures, birds, threads and chairs.

 

Do the chairs represent what is comfortable for us? Are the threads an illusion to the common connectivity and the idea of human destiny?  Are the birds symbolic of what we garner?  Are the faceless figures an attempt to distinguish the universality of human nature; possibly disregarding the individual experience?  These are some of the questions Kindler raises in an exhibition that also “gathers together” so many different medias in quiet contemplative, intellectually charged, symbolic, and playful works.

 

 

 

Theodore Waddell

50 Years of Paint

 

March 2nd - April 17th

 

This year marks Ted’s 50th year of painting. His canvases are filled with endless combinations of colors, washes and sometimes wax. His impasto way of painting gives life to his paintings. The horses feel as though they could jump of the canvas. Ted’s many techniques create unique paintings that make him proud to be an oil painter!

Lynda Lowe

The Uncertainty Principle

 

February 6 - March 3,  2009

 

Lynda Lowe’s work is a constant discovery. Her paintings rich surfaces combine vibrant colors with the quiet presence of data. “All of the text included has something to do with observation and perception. Whether it’s scientifically or poetically described, it definitely integrates the finite and the infinite, measure and mystery.” Lynda incorporates everyday objects into her work that embody a spiritual dimension; images of trees, leaves, sticks, rocks, birds, shells, and bowls. Her goal is to bring the viewer into the present moment and leave them contemplating, exploring and living in the now.

 

David deVillier

Boxes, Circles, and the Mechanics of Memory

 

David deViller’s theatrical paintings never disappoint. They are always playful, filled with mystery and meaning. He paints a beautiful scene full of possible outcomes, leaving the viewer to determine the story. "I don't portray a particular place," he says. "I invent non-specific locations to create a world that is more universal." His paintings, which center around activity or curious inactivity, explore relationships and communications.

Kenna Moser

Lost and Found

 

February 6 - March 3,  2009

 

Kenna’s delicate beeswax, vintage envelope collaged pieces are filled with beauty and poetic statements. Imbedded under layers of her wax, letters or documents dating back to the early 18th century illuminated manuscript on vellum. The elegant script further provides evidence of a lost past and a dwindling form of human communication. Appliquéd birds, bunnies, flowers and whimsical characters dance along the surface of her graceful pieces.

Jack Spencer

 

February 6 - March 3,  2009

 

Jack Spencer’s vivid photography captures a specific place and moment in time.  His photographs portray mystical images of horses and daunting images of a lost landscape. His work is sensual and often ethereal, always evoking emotion and conveying expression.

400 First Avenue North • P.O. Box 1679 Ketchum, ID 83340-1679 
208.726.5079  • 
info@gailseverngallery.com

 



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